The Open Booking Question–What We Know and What We Wish We Knew

The world of Open Booking is a confusing one. No one seems to understand how it’s supposed to work in sufficient detail. Beyond some broad statements about how much travelers want it and how you can apply the concept to suit your situation, those devilish details are left to look after themselves.

Its business case has never been fully or adequately developed. No one has ever successfully demonstrated, using adequately supported data and research, that Open Booking (to the degree it is described and understood) even works, financially or operationally.

Some of our colleagues also claim too much for Open Booking. There is a tendency to believe that Open Booking is inevitable because there are serious flaws and failings with how travel management is conducted. Open Booking is not the sole alternative–there are equally, if not more valid management techniques that can be employed.

It’s one choice among many, and based upon the answers that are available it isn’t a very good choice. It would be great if more solid information were forthcoming, but even asking questions carries its own challenges.

Here’s an experiment for you to consider.

While the setting is intended to be light-hearted, the issues discussed are quite real and the responses are all based upon incidents in my own experience with the Open Booking Question.

Pick any of the national, regional, or larger local travel management companies that specializes in business travel, or an on line travel agency with the same specialty. Call someone from the sales department, introduce yourself and your company, and tell them that you’d like a few questions answered.

Begin by asking for a detailed explanation of how the would propose to handle your business. Respond to their questions directly and intelligently, and listen to their explanation. You may not like what you hear, but you’ll be told in sometimes painful detail how their operation works and where you fit in.

Ask all the difficult questions you want that reflect your real concerns, possible issues and contingencies you may have heard about, and criticisms of their process that you may have heard from competitors or read in the trade press. Typically, answers will be immediately forthcoming or a quick follow-up call will offer clarification.

Then, pointedly ask how they will “prove” to you that their service is any good, how it is cost-effective compared to their competitors, what evidence they will provide as to their ongoing purchasing efficiency, and how they can project and measure your savings. Remember to ask where their data come from and why these are accurate.

Without much hesitation, you’ll probably be told about benchmarking, reporting tools, econometric models, and various gadgets and systems that the person on the phone is convinced are just what you want.

Some of the answers you will receive will be interesting, others quite inventive, and still others less so–but the point is that you will get answers. These are legitimate inquiries and the business development area within travel distribution is happy (even anxious) to address them.

Try the same process on someone who is anxious to talk about the inevitability of Open Booking (or Managed Travel 2.0) and the benefits that idea provides.

You’ll be challenged to get a comprehensive description of how Open Booking works, largely because no one has adequately defined the operational details and how they apply in the real world. People have their own ideas but there is no shared view–and the experts create explanations as they need them.

Even though Open Booking has been a popular topic for some time, difficulties continue to pop-up that no one has thought through (see here for example). The list of questions that should have been considered and have not is long and tedious.

You’re likely to learn that Open Booking is a concept that you must apply in ways that suit your own situation. Patiently remind the person that, if this is true, Open Booking has descended to the level of how you’ve been handling your travel for the last 40 years, and suggest that the proverb “there is nothing new under the sun” may also be true.

Remind them that the apostles of the Open Booking doctrine want the industry to adopt it as a premise for doing business, as an overriding concept that reshapes how managed travel is understood in the current century, and as an inevitability brought about as a result of how traveler attitudes and expectations have been reshaped in the Internet age.

In such a toplofty setting, some comprehensive definition, description, and attention to detail is not too much to ask.

Next, take a deep breath and ask your contact to prove to you that the operational system they have described to you (to the degree this has happened) can and will work, that they have considered all relevant details, and that sustainable savings (offset by any costs and business risks that you might incur) have resulted in other settings and will result for you.

Remember to insist on clarity as to where the data come from, how reports were developed, and why they are accurate. Don’t be content with unsourced figures pulled at random or comments from published materials with an equal lack of transparency.

Your spokesperson will likely be affronted at your having the temerity to ask such questions. You may be informed that “proof” is unreasonable and impolite, and that countless satisfied travelers are enjoying excessive (but unspecified) savings and satisfaction through Open Booking, so it is up to you to join their happy throng.

Such requests for “proof” will likely be dismissed by comments such as “that’s what the marketplace is doing.”

As you politely close the conversation, a gentle reminder that it is the “marketplace” that just asked the question may be in order. When the call is over, you might also reflect upon how long a TMC that gave a similar answer would remain in business.

What Have We Learned?

I’m not sure why many observers are prepared to give Open Booking “a pass” in settings where other parts of the travel distribution system are held to a much higher standard.

This may be because Open Booking sounds technological or scientific, that they are beguiled by its promises that amount to the benefits of managed travel without much of the work, or that it’s simply (at least for many) an attractive and new idea.

Open Booking is none of these things. It is essentially the same complaints and objections to managed travel that have been wandering about for decades, now in a new suit of technological clothes, with the promises that gadgets, web sites, and reporting methods have succeeded in changing human nature.

Travel buyers should rightly expect better answers to how Open Booking works, how real-world problems can be affordably addressed, and the financial benefits it delivers (in all instances using better data and analysis than has been forthcoming thus far).

Advocates of Open Booking should consider it their obligation to provide nothing less.

Open Booking, lacking better evidence, simply doesn’t make sense. Because many people believe Open Booking to be a good idea, I’d have thought that an adequate, specific, detailed business case would not only be easy to produce but would have been forthcoming long ago.

I’m anxious to see it.

More Bad News For Open Booking

Consistent with my prior comments on the management hazards of Open Booking, travel attorney Mark Pestronk remarks that:

“Open booking presents a serious legal problem that no one has yet touched on: By allowing employees to use the public websites and mobile apps offered by suppliers and online travel agencies, travelers and their employers waive all of the contractual and other legal rights that they normally have under U.S. law.”

Read his article at:

Corporate travelers surrender rights with ‘open booking’ – Travel Weekly

The Business Reality of Open Booking

This analysis appeared October 9, 2013 in Cornerstone Information System’s “Insight & Opinion” section.


Open Booking, noun: A travel industry term concocted to describe the process whereby problems that don’t exist are solved using techniques that don’t work, so as to produce savings that can’t be defined.

I’m not specifically against Open Travel or Open Booking, but if it’s such a good idea a straightforward case should be made in favor of it, using real data and sound business arguments. The fact that this doesn’t happen is very telling.

Open Booking rests upon a theoretical foundation that is distant from the real world and requires us to suspend belief in how travel distribution works if we are to adopt it. A few business concerns and examples may bring Open Booking’s contradictions into focus.

Travel Management Companies

The “M” in TMC represents Management. TMCs provide value because they appropriately manage the travel process on behalf of their customers; when they fail that value disappears.

Open Booking’s proponents speak of the evolving role for TMCs looking like a subscription-based service where agents provide support regardless of where and how reservations are made. How this might be an improvement over a TMC’s involvement in the current online booking process is left somewhat mysterious.

In the real world, TMC experience and expertise can shorten the path to correct decisions and avoid the wreckage from bad ones. While it’s not impossible to clean-up problems after the fact, it is typically more difficult and expensive–as anyone with experience at a subscription-based 24-hour travel support service could tell you.

To suggest that TMCs should support corporate travel in this mode by default is to say that their services have little or no value–which is clearly not the case.

Whatever its flaws, travel management operates the way it does because it works. Desiring to correct those flaws is not a testimonial for Open Booking.

Duty of Care

Corporate travel managers should have concerns beyond the basic cost of travel services, one being duty of care. Broadly speaking, in the real world this is a generally accepted principle which says that individuals must take reasonable care when performing actions that could foreseeably cause harm.

It applies in business as in other areas of life. Concerning travel, the possible implications are obvious, as there are numerous services informed and prudent people should not use, places they should not go, and things they should not do.

Allowing or even requiring travelers to bypass a source of expertise that is well-known, established, and otherwise available to them might not cause a duty of care problem, but the potential is real and shouldn’t be dismissed in the quest for imaginary travel cost savings.

Managed or Not?

Open Booking supporters often affirm that it is not the same as unmanaged travel–a distinction without a difference. When you stop managing in the real world you allow events under your control to be handled in whatever ways the people involved feel is appropriate.

That is the essence of Open Booking. The fact that you might be able to collect data, count the cost of the result, and disagree with choices made doesn’t compensate for the lack of control.

Since 2002 public companies in the United States have operated under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX), which is a complex set of financial regulations that are intended to correct the financial and management errors that caused the financial scandals of that period. Among many other things, it requires the management of public companies to take specific responsibility for financial reports and for their own actions.

It also imposes requirements as to internal financial controls, conflicts of interest, and the level of understanding management and auditors must have over internal processes and procedures.

Travel is a significant part of most public company finances–often among the largest expenditures. While the specific implications of SOX vary substantially by company, why would it be in the interest of any manager facing such obligations to forsake management-based controls over expenditures that might be counted in the millions in exchange for unproven lower costs and a somewhat lesser level of employee complaints?

SOX is very difficult to reconcile with Open Booking–counting what has been spent or even establishing budgets for travel is not sufficient, as SOX requires control and meaningful representations that proper procedures have been followed.

The Business Reality

Open Booking as it is currently represented is a bad idea for travel agents who have no realistic role in its operation. It’s equally bad for corporate travel managers who are asked to abandon the tools that are central to doing their jobs.

 

Open Travel and Industry Mythology

This analysis appeared August 12, 2013 in Cornerstone Information System’s “Insight & Opinion” section.


You may have heard of something called “open travel” or “open booking,” that is about to change corporate travel procurement. It says that travelers will book whatever they want as long as they don’t exceed budgets and fulfill other vague management requirements, such as paying with a corporate credit card.

Travel Management Companies will have to find new roles (no one is quite sure what those might be) and corporate travel managers will see their responsibilities changed, or substantially diminished.

Proponents of this new travel management strategy, which include some substantial travel buyers and data managers, assure us that travelers are buying where the want anyway, so clearly it’s best to make the best of the inevitable.

What’s interesting is that this isn’t new.

Prior to the mid 1980s, when consolidating travel procurement with a few designated travel management companies became popular, it was the default purchasing system–set your budget and let the rest take care of itself.

I’m confident that proponents of “open travel” believe that technology has advanced so much over the last 30 years that the essential management problems that resulted in consolidated travel management are no longer issues.

If we simply wait long enough, smart phones will solve everything–they’ll even change human nature.

Can Less Be More?

There are few analytical reports describing open travel’s effectiveness–those that do exist are contradictory and most are poorly executed(i). As a business strategy, open travel advances several logical fallacies that we should try to avoid:

Hasty Generalization

It doesn’t necessarily follow that because some, even most, travel management programs perform poorly and that they are at odds with new technology, that all such programs must do the same.

It also doesn’t follow that travelers in general will make informed and rational purchasing decisions absent a centrally managed travel program because some travelers appear to do so, for some of their trips, at least some of the time.

Open travel’s proponents need to conclusively demonstrate that the business rules they suggest the industry adopt are not based upon the behavior of a small sample operating under exceptional conditions.

Faulty Dilemma

Because there are clear shortcomings with travel management practice, we are not necessarily left with a “strength through weakness” strategy that allows travelers to book whatever they want as the alternative. There are other choices.

The Big Picture

Centralized travel management exists because it is effective. Vendors extend favorable pricing and other services to purchasers because they believe the benefits exceed the cost.

Part of what vendors presume is that travel managers will influence selection and behavior. Travel programs that consistently deliver such results are those that succeed.

Why would vendors offer similar benefits where buyers stop trying to do these things Control is an essential component of preferred pricing, and open travel is signal for higher prices, not lower.

The mythology of the travel industry asserts that technology allows individuals to find as good or better discounts in the marketplace as are available through managed travel programs.

Again, that’s nothing new, the assertion has been made for as long as there have been centralized travel programs. In practice there are always exceptional situations, but consistently poor discounts are signs of a poor travel programs, not testimonials for open travel.

Technology makes traveler shopping somewhat easier, but it doesn’t make informed buyers or change human behavior. Again with exceptions, travelers do not usually share the management goals of their companies–part of a travel manager’s role is to provide structure for those goals.

A traveler’s agenda is more personal and can always be validated by countless rationalizations and “this time is different” conclusions. There is no lack of creativity in this area.

To expect individual and company goals to align so as to correctly and consistently influence individual traveler behavior is to assume that people will stop behaving like people because they have better smart phone applications and are free to use them.

Open travel is less efficient than centralized travel management, not more. It assumes pricing practices that don’t today exist, people acting in ways they don’t normally do, and, even if these point are granted, that it is the best use of a traveler’s time to research prices and keep sufficiently informed so as to make good decisions.

It’s a theory that assumes much and delivers little.
(i) Unless a study describes a sound methodology, an adequate sample size, and the precise questions it tried to answer, which is almost never the case, it falls into this category. Please see my paper on this topic.

Corporate Mobile Travel Strategy

This analysis appeared June 14, 2013 in Cornerstone Information System’s “Insight & Opinion” section.


By now you’ve been thoroughly exposed to the idea that mobile applications (affectionately termed “apps”) are an essential part of travel technology. There’s no denying that mobile applications are popular, but understanding why and to what extent is more difficult.

Equally challenging is interpreting the specific implications for your business.

Business Case

Perhaps you’re as tired as I am of being told you “need” a mobile travel strategy, and it would be interesting to first understand what you could accomplish.

Proponents usually start building their case with surveys and research which suggest businesses without mobile capabilities risk being “overwhelmed” by competitors, as the number of people initiating travel transactions on mobile devices expands to eclipse all other methods.

This argument runs aground somewhat because almost all this research isn’t very good. Briefly, almost all popular industry researchers don’t disclose their financial backers and biases, or their research methods, and their products aren’t scientifically designed or operated.

We’re left to conclude that, from among the hundreds of millions of smartphones and tablets, consumers simply must be looking for travel products, even if specific numbers can’t be verified.

Competition among the literally millions of app developers is intense–for room on the device and consumer attention if nothing else. Of the dozens of apps on your device, how many do you really use?

Five or six is an oft-quoted number.

I’m not arguing against mobility or applications, just pointing out that the barriers to successful entry are significant, and assuming these are unimportant because the market must be huge doesn’t make it so, or drive travelers to use a mobile app simply because you offer it.

In the simplest terms, people probably use mobile applications for some of the following reasons:

  • Having a computer with you everywhere you go is certainly handy.
  • Most people didn’t do that much with their PCs anyway–the transition to mobile is fairly straightforward.
  • The apps can look and behave better than on a PC, because building tools in a web browser was never a really great idea.
  • Most travel vendors have made communicating with them so difficult and unpleasant that the simplest, handiest form of electronic access looks very attractive.

As you start thinking about a mobile strategy, consider carefully the real reasons you believe travelers will support it.

The Best Tool Is the One That Works

Corporate travel buyers are often presented a surprisingly sparse list of mobile application choices. Much of what is on offer doesn’t do much or work very well.

Consumers have always had a high tolerance for flawed travel technology–a frequent reaction being that, if it works at all, it works wonderfully. The basis for a successful mobile strategy might be to insist on delivering real value and performance to the customer.

Determine what the service and business needs of your travelers are, then look for products that can approximate those requirements with an acceptable level of change to your operation.

For example, if you’ve determined that travelers should be able to request, change, and reconcile their trips from a mobile device, be certain that the tools you select allow that to happen with very few failures, limited training, modest traveler effort, and acceptable recourse when things go wrong.

These sound like “everybody does that” goals, but in practice they are difficult. Don’t be coaxed into accepting marginal products simply because they’re mobile.

It appropriate to set more modest goals that support your overall service strategy and that you can successfully reach.

The Best Tool Is No Tool

The travel industry is often anxious to build solutions to problems that shouldn’t be solved. No tool, mobile or otherwise, can change the fact that most “technology problems” are really unresolved management problems.

Often your business goals are better supported by altering procedures and requirements to make problems go away, as opposed to looking for the latest apps that might solve them.

The distance between mobile applications and other computer-based tools isn’t very great, and no computer ever compensated for poor procedures and policies, unrealistic expectations, traveler misbehavior, or a failure to manage.

Mobility is best viewed not as the centerpiece, but rather as an intelligent and convenient enabler for your comprehensive product, service, and travel strategy.